Metro Chamber Orchestra performs world premiere of Deon Nielsen Price's Concerto for Oneness, April 27,2013, Amanda Lo, violinist; Philip Nuzzo, Conductor.
From the first notes of movement one, Energico, I knew I was in for a treat. The energy and power of the opening told the audience that we were at "one" with the music. We were blessed to have a fine soloist, Amanda Lo, who played with deep expression and understanding of Price's, concerto. The first movement had a stunning change of mood in its center which was persuasive and instructive in its musical purpose to make a convincing statement that each person has the one ability to identify her unique self. When we were back once again to the passion of the opening measures, we were, as one, uplifted and joyful.

The second movement, Andante, was gorgeous, it helped us find that oneness in the first movement in a more quiet place within ourselves. The violin played sweetly with moving intensity, fulfilling the intent of the composer. Complex, though accessible, you could feel the involvement of the audience, at one with the music, being entered by the music with quiet welcome.

Energico-Giocoso, the third movement, was exactly named, it was joyful energy. The hope, the boundless enthusiasm of this music was inspiring. We were left with an infusion of joy that the audience proclaimed, not only with applause, but with the energy the movement had given us.

From the program notes we learned that the composer based harmony and rhythm on a chord with Interval Vector 1 1 1 1 1 1. The result is a violin concerto style that is both familiar and strange, tonal but neither major or minor.

This splendid piece was on a season finale program including C.P.E. Bach's Concerto for flute in D Minor and Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with the Brooklyn Conservatory Chorale at St. Ann and the Holy Trinity in Brooklyn. Price's Concerto for Oneness has a special place in her oeuvre that I will remember and keep with me forever. Thank you for the music which I which I loved, loved, loved.

Review by Lucille Field, Soprano, Professor Emerita, Brooklyn College, New York City